Background

But Which To Choose?

THE PROS & CONS: OVERDRAFT

A short-term form of debt to help cover the costs of generating sales, prior to receipt of payment for those sales. Normally used when selling on trade credit and to help pay direct costs of production (ingredients, wages, packaging etc.) as well as fixed costs (rent, rates, insurance etc).

Generally agreed by banks for 12 month periods subject to annual review, to cover the peaks and troughs in the business cash flow cycle, but can also be arranged for one-off, much shorter periods for more specific requirements.

PROS & CONS

THE PROS & CONS: OVERDRAFT

A short-term form of debt to help cover the costs of generating sales, prior to receipt of payment for those sales. Normally used when selling on trade credit and to help pay direct costs of production (ingredients, wages, packaging etc.) as well as fixed costs (rent, rates, insurance etc).

Generally agreed by banks for 12 month periods subject to annual review, to cover the peaks and troughs in the business cash flow cycle, but can also be arranged for one-off, much shorter periods for more specific requirements.

PROS & CONS

THE PROS & CONS: OVERDRAFT

A short-term form of debt to help cover the costs of generating sales, prior to receipt of payment for those sales. Normally used when selling on trade credit and to help pay direct costs of production (ingredients, wages, packaging etc.) as well as fixed costs (rent, rates, insurance etc).

Generally agreed by banks for 12 month periods subject to annual review, to cover the peaks and troughs in the business cash flow cycle, but can also be arranged for one-off, much shorter periods for more specific requirements.

THE PROS & CONS: OVERDRAFT

A short-term form of debt to help cover the costs of generating sales, prior to receipt of payment for those sales. Normally used when selling on trade credit and to help pay direct costs of production (ingredients, wages, packaging etc.) as well as fixed costs (rent, rates, insurance etc).

Generally agreed by banks for 12 month periods subject to annual review, to cover the peaks and troughs in the business cash flow cycle, but can also be arranged for one-off, much shorter periods for more specific requirements.